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The Flutter of the Belly

This is a move that I have been working on for ages and every time I don’t feel that I am making  much progress. Here is some information to help.

The key with the belly flutter is to get relaxed and practice. It is a contraction of the muscles that control breathing and not actually the abdominal muscles. Usually these muscles are referred to as the diaphragm. Strictly speaking the diaphragm is actually a set of involuntary muscles (meaning you can not control them) and the muscles you are using are called the intercostal muscles. These muscles, just like any other group of muscles, needs to be stretched and exercised to be effectively used.

This is a simple E how article on how to do the basic belly flutter. Below that are two videos. The first is a short explanation on flutters and the second goes in a bit more depth.

E How: How to Perform a Belly Dance Flutter

If you are practicing the belly flutter I suggest you start laying down or sitting. Doing this will help you relax you abdominal muscles since you do not need to focus on posture or layering. Also laying down forces your intercostal muscles to work more effectively which can help in isolating and practicing this move. The most important thing about this step is to practice, which I plan on doing as much as possible.

Note: How to stretch you breathing muscles

I learn this one in Drum Corps years back. Stand up straight with you hands clasped over your head. Take a deep breath in and hold it. Take two to three more little sips of air. At this point you should feel full to the brim with air. Now hold the air in and slowly do a side bend stretch. You can do this to each side and if you have enough air, you will be able to stretch the muscles that are used for breathing. I find this is good to do beforehand after practicing the belly flutter. (Warning some times taking in that much air can make you dizzy. Its normal. Just resume breathing regularly and it should pass.)

Good luck.
-Nara

Tribal Makeup Tips

I have a few performances coming up and that has me thinking about stage makeup.

Some of my favorite makeup tips:

1. Always use a base or moisturizer before putting on your make-up. Make sure to put it on your eyes (carefully) before applying shadow or base. You will be amazed on how much better your makeup stays when you give it something to hold on to.

2.Have fun with eye liner. This is really for the tribal dancers. Invest in a good black eyeliner that you can use well and use often. I am not one to preach about kinds of eyeliner because ever dancer has their own favorate. If you haven’t found yours then go and experiment. I like to test a good eyeliner out on my hand first. If I can make a nice line on the back of my hand, I have a better chance at making one on my eyelid. This also gives you a chance to see how easy it is to remove the liner.

For some basics and ideas this article is great for eye liner.

3.Use great color. I like to invest in strong colors. A good mix of bright and deep colors is usually good for a smokey and exotic eye. You can use a little water on your eyelid first before you apply the shadow to make you color richer.

Check out some of these videos for some great ideas for eye makeup. I was inspired.

4. Take your time. The biggest mistake I see dancers make is when they rush their makeup. Doing makeup correctly is like painting a picture. It takes time! Do not rush it and always give yourself more time then you think you will need.

Have fun.

-Nara

Muscle Memory aka Layering

So one of the most difficult things about belly dance is layering. You need to do the grapevine, while doing snake arms and shimmy (don’t forget to smile). The key to good layering is the dreaded word “practice” and its true. You need to practice, practice, practice. You need to build up muscle memory.

What is muscle memory? When you learning to dance you are teaching your muscles what to do and where to go. Think about the snake arm. The snake arm is a basic belly dance move which is taught in all forms of belly dance. It is a wonderful example for me because it uses so much muscle memory. The basic snake arm is broken down into many parts and when a beginner dancer learns the move, they learn them all. Slowly they speed them up and put them together. The body learns where to move and put the muscles. Over time the student no longer needs to tell the muscles where to go. The muscles have practiced enough that without thinking the body can just put the arm in the right place. Instead of thinking of all the different places to put the arm instead the dancer thinks snake arm. The dancer has acquired the muscle memory for this step.

All dancers use muscle memory when learning steps. It helps to simplify the basic steps so the dancer can focus on learning more difficult techniques. Belly dancers use this ability in a special way when they layer. To layer well a dancer needs to acquire the muscle memory for all the steps separately before they are performed together. It is important that dancer has the full understanding of each step (snake arm, grapevine, shimmy …etc) and can perform them with out much thought. This way the dancer will have the mental space in their head to focus and putting all the steps together.

What should take home from this?
1. Practicing the individual steps (drills) is useful for layering.
2. Do not try to do too much at once or your brain can’t able to handle it and it will show on your body.
3. Practice, Practice, Practice.

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